Skip the Vitamin C Supplements

I have always taken a vitamin c supplement to help with skin, immune system, and other things, but whole food sources like rose hips really are the gold standard.  In addition to having incredible amounts of vitamin C, you’re also getting dozens of other vitamins, minerals, and healing phytochemicals that you just won’t find in an isolated vitamin C pill, some of which are actually vital for proper absorption of the C.

image3/4 cup of rose hips provides:

426 mg vitamin C  (710% daily value)

17% daily value calcium

17% daily value magnesium

12% daily value potassium

51% daily value manganese

39% daily value vitamin e

(Just to name a couple)

In comparison… the same amount of raw oranges provides just 45 mg vitamin c!

So just a reminder to myself and others- pills and powders can never replace the untouched whole food nutrient sources that the earth provides us.  Food changes everything!

Megan M. Kerkhoff, CHC, AADP, CFH

Certified Holistic Practitioner/Holistic Nutritionist

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Get Even Healthier!
Are you curious about how easy-to-make changes with professional support & guidance can make a huge difference in your health, happiness, stress levels, and overall wellness? Let’s talk!  
Schedule your complimentary consultation with me today, and see how your life can change. 

http://www.aayushealth.com     –     megan@aayushealth.com    –    920-327-2221

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Peaceful Tummy Purple Juice

Wisconsin Wellness

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This beautiful juice contains ingredients that are helpful for any kind of chronic stomach issue- including colitis, heartburn, constipation, diverticulitis, diarrhea, indigestion, and ulcers.  It does has a distinctive cabbage flavor, but the bit of pineapple adds a slightly sweet hint. If you are watching your sugars, simply omit the pineapple.

This recipe provides at least 30% of your daily value of calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, manganese, vitamin c, thiamin, riboflavin, b6, folate, vitamin a, & vitamin k.

Ingredients:

1/2 purple cabbage

8 organic carrots

1/4 of a pineapple, including the core

Directions:

Juice, and enjoy!

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Are you curious about how easy-to-make changes can make a big difference in your health? Would you like help in making healthier food choices and replacing bad habits with good ones? Let’s talk! Schedule a complimentary health coaching consultation with me today – or pass this offer on to someone you care about!

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The Best and Worst Protein Shakes

Artificial sweeteners like sucralose & aspartame are commonly used in protein/meal/energy shakes marketed as “low sugar” or “sugar free” and come with a slew of proven health risks, such as kidney disease, sugar cravings, weight gain, depression, ADHD, gastrointestinal problems, miscarriage, pre-term labor, infertility, etc.

The following companies use them in their products:

Herbalife 

Thrive

Special K protein shakes

Ensure

Slim Fast

Medifast

BSN Syntha 6

Muscle Milk

Visalus Vi

Advocare

Check out the article below for other brands that have scored poorly, and some great recommendations for healthier alternatives.

http://www.eatthis.com/protein-powders

Toddler Meals to Promote a Strong Immune System & a Healthy Body

Wisconsin Wellness

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I had to share my daughter’s lunch from today because it looked so darn pretty- hard boiled organic eggs with paprika, spelt pancakes with coconut oil & mulberries, organic apple slices, and a stalk of organic celery. She LOVES meals like this!

Kids meals don’t have to be complex- look for simple, whole food ingredients, and try to include a veggie, a fruit, a protein, a good fat, and a whole grain. (I much prefer whole grains to flours, but these spelt pancakes are a weekend treat for us!). Chemical-free, whole foods like this will keep your kiddo’s immune system strong, will support healthy physical and mental development, and will ensure they maintain good eating habits into adulthood.

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Are you curious about how easy-to-make changes can make a big difference in your health? Would you like help in making healthier food choices and replacing bad habits with good…

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Buttery Wild Mushroom Pilaf with Asparagus – Wild gourmet healing dinner for $.35 per serving!

 

SONY DSCTonight’s dinner is a lovely sprouted brown rice risotto with bits of peas and carrots, cooked with some chopped wild wood nettle, which can be used just as spinach or kale would but is much more nutritious. I sauteed the morels (can use any edible wild mushroom) until golden in a bit of butter and Himalayan salt.  Simply sub the butter for something like olive oil to make this vegetarian dish vegan. The pilaf is sprinkled with chives from my garden & flowers from the creeping charlie “weed” in my yard. A garnish of another delicious “weed” in my yard- goldenrod shoots.

Not only is this the type of gourmet meal you’d only find at an upscale restaurant, it’s more nutritious than just about anything you’ll find at a grocery store, and nearly free of cost. Every ingredient has healing properties! What is your experience with foraging- have you picked berries, morels, or asparagus? Let us know! If you’d like to learn more about wild food foraging, check out Wild Food Wisconsin & Aayus Holistic Health Services on facebook.  And helping people live healthier & happier and tackle even the trickiest health issues is my specialty as a naturopathic practitioner- don’t hesitate to contact me at megan@aayushealth.com for your free consult!

– – Goldenrod is good for colds, flu, inflammation, allergies (it’s an antihistamine, not an allergen), & UTIs.
– – Nettles are food for high blood pressure, kidney stones, allergies (also antihistamine), anemia, hay fever, are restorative, antihemorrhagic, nutritive, & promotes lactation & circulation
– – Morels are a great source of vitamin D, are anti-cancer & have been found to reduce the side effects of chemo/radiation
– – Asparagus is a diuretic, supports kidney function, prostate health, helps to prevent cataracts, supports the liver, supports sexual function & helps with muscle recovery
– – Brown rice is great for digestion and helps to normalize bowel function after diarrhea. It helps lower cholesterol, reduce risk of bowel cancer, lower diabetes risk
– – Chives are good for digestion, anemia, relieving gas, help prevent heart disease and stroke, and help your body to digest good fats.
– – Creeping Charlie is anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and has been used traditionally for ulcers, asthma, and clearing up skin. It can be used as a hopping agent to make beer.

Megan M. Kerkhoff, CHC, AADP, CFH

http://www.aayushealth.com

Follow me on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/AayusHealth and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/aayushealth/

Get Even Healthier!
Are you curious about how easy-to-make changes with professional support & guidance can make a huge difference in your health, happiness, stress levels, and overall wellness? Let’s talk!  
Schedule your complimentary consultation with me today, and see how your life can change. 

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My first morel of the year, used in my dinner! (it’s giant!!)

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The wild wood nettles

Creamy Wild Watercress & Nettle Soup

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Wild watercress and nettles are sprouting in Wisconsin, and they are quite the culinary treat!

High in calcium, iron, vitamin c, beta-carotene, magnesium, potassium, zinc, copper, vitamin E, vitamin K, lutein, b vitamins, and many more, watercress is rich in potent antioxidants that help to fight cancer. It’s been found to help smokers or those exposed to secondhand smoke excrete the toxins found in cigarettes from their urine in just 3 days.  It’s also good for liver problems.

Stinging nettles are my go-to safe alternative to allergy drugs. They help hayfever and any type of allergies, supporting the immune system and anti-inflammatory response naturally, instead of just covering up symptoms like drugs. This mint can be used for prostate problems, PMS, asthma, bronchitis, sciatica, tendonitis, multiple sclerosis, gout, hives, kidney stones, sciatica, high blood pressure, & eczema. Just about one cup of this veggie will give you half the calcium you need for the day, with good amounts of magnesium, manganese, iron, b vitamins, vitamin k, beta carotene, and potassium.

Both greens are excellent for treating anemia, purifying the blood, and for arthritis.   Note: Be careful not to touch the nettles without gloves- they bite!

Ingredients:

2 cups MSG-free vegetable broth

2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil or organic butter

1 small onion, roughly chopped

1 bunch of watercress

1 bunch of nettles

2 medium potatoes, peeled & chopped

2 tbsp finely chopped fresh chives

¼ cup organic whole plain yogurt, extra to garnish (eliminate to make vegan)

Sprinkle of chives to garnish

Himalayan salt & black pepper to taste

 

Directions:

Bring the broth to a boil, and add the potatoes. Meanwhile in a large saucepan, heat the butter/oil over medium heat. Add the nettles, watercress, and onions. Turn heat down a bit and cook until the onions are translucent. Once your potatoes are tender, add the cooked greens mixture to the pot and boil for a couple minutes. Place in your food processor or blender and puree until smooth. Add the yogurt, then season to taste with the salt & pepper. Ladle into bowls immediately and enjoy!

Megan M. Kerkhoff, CHC, AADP, CFH

http://www.aayushealth.com

Follow me on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/AayusHealth and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/aayushealth/

Get Even Healthier!
Are you curious about how easy-to-make changes with professional support & guidance can make a huge difference in your health, happiness, stress levels, and overall wellness? Let’s talk!  
Schedule your complimentary consultation with me today, and see how your life can change. 

Ghost Pipes

Update:  I’m happy to say the author of the article mentioned here has updated her article since mine was published. It is a bit more accurate now.

I’ve seen this floating around quite a bit, and it’s created many misconceptions surrounding Monotropa Uniflora, also known as Ghost Pipes or Indian Pipes.

To respect a plant is to tell the truth, not create misconceptions. To honor it. To approach it with both evidence-based information and ancient wisdom. I urge people to respect this plant. I urge people to understand practical use.

On that note, let me debunk some of the statements in this opinion piece with information coming directly from the Wisconsin DNR and the University of Wisconsin Department of Botany.

(Note: As with any plant, distribution will vary from state to state, from country to country. This article reflects information from Wisconsin as well as most parts of the eastern United states. Check with your local DNR/University extension for information on your area.)

Per University of Wisconsin Department of Botany-

Monotropa Uniflora (Ghost pipes or Indian pipes) are NOT endangered, and are abundant in North and Central America. They are widely abundant in Wisconsin. It is not disappearing. It is not rare.

Picking the stems while leaving the roots undisturbed does NOT affect future growth. As with many plants, it is important to leave the roots so that your harvesting is sustainable. It is a traditional Native American medicinal plant, and indeed is useful to humans and has been used for many centuries as a medicine. Medicinal uses are documented, and provide benefits unlike any other plant we know of. Uses range from treating PTSD to chronic pain. As it is very potent and does not work well for individuals with certain health conditions, I would advise using it under supervision of a trained professional.

Ethics and conservation are indeed important. ALL medicinal plants deserve respect. Sustainably harvesting a widely abundant plant is no more about ego, objectification, or “plant porn” than harvesting/photographing echinacea, motherwort, St Johns wort, or any other beneficial plant.

Let me give you an example- one of my favorite medicinals, blue vervain, is rare in Wisconsin. I have only one patch I’ve found. I harvest about 25% of the patch every year, leaving the roots intact, as I have done for about 5 years. The patch has grown noticeably over the years.

In addition to that, Ghost Pipe does not photosynthesize like a typical plant. As it gets all of its sugars from fungal mycelium, the aerial parts are primarily for reproduction and not necessary to sustain the root. So as long as you leave seed to help spread some, harvesting this plant is actually more sustainable than any perennial plant that needs to photosynthesize to sustain the sugars in the taproot.

In summary, there is no science or evidence behind the claims in this article and I’d like to put that to rest. Respect the facts, respect the evidence, respect our environment and the food and medicine it provides for us, respect and pass on our ancestors wisdom and traditions.

 

Read more about this plant and its distribution here: http://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=MOUN3

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Giant Puffball Mushroom “Steak” & Eggs

If you can hunt down some wild giant puffball mushrooms you can enjoy it in many ways- from a nutritious bread, pizza crust, or meat substitute, to a healthy alternative to tofu.

My Puffball Mushroom “Steak” & Eggs recipe is a tasty example of how it can either be a beef or bread sub.

Directions:

Heat olive oil or butter in a cast iron pan. Peel the mushroom, slice into patties, and pick any dirt off. Saute both sides in the pan until it’s a light golden brown color. I sprinkled with Himalayan salt.

Pan fry an egg, and top with a bit of Himalayan salt, black pepper, and smoked paprika. When it’s done to your preference, place it on top of your puffball patty. Sprinkle with toppings like chopped chives and halved cherry tomatoes.

r_seaman@hotmail.com

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Thanks for visiting!

Megan M. Kerkhoff, CHC, AADP, CFH

http://www.aayushealth.com

Follow me on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/AayusHealth and Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/aayushealth/

Get Even Healthier!
Are you curious about how easy-to-make changes can make a big difference in your health? Would you like help in making healthier food choices and replacing bad habits with good ones? Let’s talk! Schedule a complimentary health coaching consultation with me today – or pass this offer on to someone you care about!

The Most Intriguing Watermelon…

This week at my favorite farm stand- yellow watermelon! Apparently they are an heirloom variety, and twice as sweet as red watermelon. And the taste test confirmed! It does have a bit of a honey flavor.

Did you know that pink watermelon has more lycopene than tomatoes? (that’s one of the heart-healthy photochemicals).  And all watermelon is good for libido, fighting inflammation, and lowering blood pressure?

Read more about the benefits of watermelon here:  http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/07/21/watermelon-nutrition.aspx

And if you’re interested in where to buy this delicious treat, visit Dan Eickert’s farm stand on the corner of Madison & OO in Little Chute.

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Get Even Healthier!

Would you like support in making your own health dreams come true? Are you curious about how easy-to-make changes can make a big difference in your health? Would you like help in making healthier food choices and replacing bad habits with good ones? Let’s talk!  Schedule a complimentary health counseling consultation with me today – or pass this offer on to someone you care about!  Schedule your consult by contacting us at  http://www.aayushealth.com,  megan@aayushealth.com, or 920-327-2221.

Megan Kerkhoff is a Certified Health Counselor and Certified Family Herbalist at Aayus Holistic Health Services in Neenah, Wisconsin, and resides in Little Chute, Wisconsin.

Protein-Packed Veggie Soup

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It’s simple, tasty, and super healthy. This soup is vegan, gluten free, plant based, and chock full of vitamins, minerals, and healing phytonutrients. The beans pack in the protein, while the vegetables complete it with all 18 amino acids.

Ingredients:

1 frozen bag of soup veggies (whichever you prefer)

1/2 bag of dried and soaked black eyed peas

About 50-60 ounces of vegetable broth (MSG free)

Seasonings to taste- I added a sprinkling of garlic powder, onion powder, and Himalayan salt.

Directions: 

Bring the broth to a boil, and add the beans. Add the bag of veggies about 30

minutes later. Keep an eye on the beans- they should be soft after a total of 45-60 minutes in the boiling broth. Season to taste and serve!

 

Get Even Healthier!

Would you like support in making your own health dreams come true? Are you curious about how easy-to-make changes can make a big difference in your health? Would you like help in making healthier food choices and replacing bad habits with good ones? Let’s talk!  Schedule a complimentary health counseling consultation with me today – or pass this offer on to someone you care about!  Schedule your consult by contacting us at  http://www.aayushealth.com,  megan@aayushealth.com, or 920-327-2221.

Megan Kerkhoff is a Certified Health Counselor and Certified Family Herbalist at Aayus Holistic Health Services in Neenah, Wisconsin, and resides in Little Chute, Wisconsin.