Banana Blackstrap Blood Building Smoothie

If you’re suffering from iron-deficiency anemia, this is just the recipe for you. It may not look the prettiest, but it is sweet & tasty.

Iron absorption is about more than just the iron. Nutrients like vitamin C, copper, manganese, vitamin a, and folate are essential for healthy ferritin and iron levels, and healthy red blood cell counts. Without the proper nutritional balance, you may find that your iron supplements alone just don’t cut it. This is why when trying to correct a nutritional deficiency, utilizing complimentary whole foods in addition to any supplements is instrumental.

This recipe contains some of the best blood-boosting ingredients in an easy to drink smoothie, supplying plant-based iron plus all of the essential nutrients mentioned above for proper assimilation.

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Ingredients:

  • 1 frozen banana
  • 1 tablespoon black strap molasses
  • ¼ tsp raw cacao powder
  • 1 cup almond milk
  • Handful of spinach or kale
  • 2-4 drops pure vanilla extract

Blend, and enjoy once daily!

Warmly,

Megan Normansell, CHC, AADP, CFH

Certified Holistic Practitioner/Holistic Nutritionist/Herbalist/Wild Edibles Guide

Follow me on Facebook and Instagram for more recipes and healthy living ideas!

Interested in healing your body naturally?
Get the answers you’ve been searching for, and heal your body for good… naturally. We have successfully helped thousands of people across the country live a healthier life than they ever could have imagined, and specialize in dozens of different health concerns. Curious? Schedule your complimentary consultation with me today! Read the incredible reviews we’ve received over the years here.

http://www.aayushealth.com – megan@aayushealth.com – 920-327-2221

 

Copyright Megan Normansell 2018 All rights reserved. 

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Lentil Tacos with Creamy Avocado Lime Dressing

Trying to lose weight, reduce portions, reduce inflammation, regulate digestion, improve diabetes, treat anemia, increase energy, prevent cancer,  improve atherosclerosis, support heart health, help your nervous system, live longer, or grow a healthy baby? Lentils, a part of the human diet since Paleolithic times, may be your new best friend. This pulse even has more disease-fighting phenols than apples, cherries, plums, broccoli, cabbage, grapes, & onions.

Watch for my upcoming article on the scientifically proven health benefits of this nutritional powerhouse, but in the meantime- enjoy this delectable gluten free, high protein, & vegetarian dish!

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Filling Ingredients:

  • 1 medium onion, finely diced
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • I large tomato, cubed
  • 2 cups of cooked lentils
  • 1 tsp chili powder
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp Himalayan salt
  • 2 cups of shredded red cabbage
  • Juice of 1/2 lime
  • 4 medium carrots, shredded
  • Cilantro to garnish
  • ½ avocado, sliced or cubed
  • 8 organic corn tortillas

Sauce Ingredients:

  • ½ cup organic plain Greek yogurt
  • ¼ tsp Himalayan salt
  • Juice of 1/2 lime
  • ½ pureed avocado

Directions:

  1. Heat the olive oil in a large pan and saute the onions for 3-5 minutes or until translucent.
  2. Add the chili powder, paprika, cumin, garlic, turmeric, salt, cooked lentils, and tomatoes to the onions, and stir well for another 5 minutes.
  3. Place your carrot shreds and cabbage shreds in their own bowls. Cut your lime in half and squeeze one of the halves over the carrots and cabbage. Sprinkle with Himalayan salt.
  4. Prepare your sauce by mixing the yogurt, avocado puree, ¼ tsp salt, and the juice from the remaining lime half together in a bowl.
  5. Serve on warmed tortillas as pictured and enjoy!

 

Warmly,

Megan Normansell, CHC, AADP, CFH

Certified Holistic Practitioner/Holistic Nutritionist/Herbalist/Wild Edibles Guide

Follow me on Facebook and Instagram for more recipes and healthy living ideas!

Interested in healing your body naturally?
Get the answers you’ve been searching for, and heal your body for good… naturally. We have successfully helped thousands of people across the country live a healthier life than they ever could have imagined, and specialize in dozens of different health concerns. Curious? Schedule your complimentary consultation with me today! Read the incredible reviews we’ve received over the years here.

http://www.aayushealth.com – megan@aayushealth.com – 920-327-2221

 

Copyright Megan Normansell 2018 All rights reserved. 

Folate vs Folic Acid: Are you being duped?

Folate, or vitamin b9, is a water-soluble nutrient that was first discovered when it was found that brewer’s yeast (a source of b vitamins) could prevent anemia. Folate is essential for brain health, energy production, formation of red blood cells, immune system, protein metabolism, and regulation of homocysteine levels. It’s a coenzyme in DNA and RNA synthesis, so it is important for healthy cell division and replication. Folate is especially important during pregnancy as a deficiency can result in neural tube defects and/or premature birth. Pre-conception nutrition is important, because low folate levels BEFORE conception increases the risk of birth defects as well.  For men, women, and children, low folate levels can cause anemia, digestive problems, fatigue, prematurely greying hair, memory problems, insomnia, paranoia, anxiety, weakness, growth impairment, and depression.

Just a “little bit” pregnant with my daughter, Eliana

Now the big debate: is there a difference between folate and folic acid? The short answer is yes. Folate is the version of b9 that occurs naturally in foods. Folic acid is a synthesized version of the vitamin that will never be found in nature. Vitamins are always best when obtained from real, whole food sources. For some, particularly for those with an MTHFR genetic defect (fairly common), folic acid can mean trouble as it can be difficult to convert the synthetic version over to the usable form of the vitamin.

Now here’s where food & supplement companies trick you:

  1. Even if folate is listed on the nutrition facts, it’s not always actually folate. Manufacturers know ‘folate’ is something consumers are looking for, so they may list it as “folate (as folic acid).” If the nutrition facts list the form as ‘folate’ but you see ‘folic acid’ on the ingredients list, it is indeed synthetic folic acid. If you do not see the word ‘folic acid’ anywhere in those two spots, it should be the natural form of the vitamin.

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    “Early Promise Prenatal” Gentle Multiple

  2. A product labeled “all natural” or “organic” is not always 100% natural and not always using natural forms of the vitamins. Check your labels for ‘folic acid.’ Many “high quality” nutritional shakes, protein powders, and multivitamins tout themselves as being natural or whole food based, when the reality is they’re going the cheap route and using poor quality vitamins. Marketing, marketing, marketing.
  3. Whole foods don’t need vitamin fortification, because they are whole foods. The nutrients are already in there, in the perfect balance nature intended. When you see a food fortified with folic acid, it means it’s been highly processed and is most likely not healthy at all.

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    (real food tastes better anyways!)

Where CAN I get folate from?

  1. Genuinely natural multivitamin or folate supplements. Check out my list of some of my favorite multivitamins that only use the food-derived folate instead of folic acid.
  2. REAL FOOD! Really, this is always the best way. While supplements can be helpful (especially during pregnancy) they can never replace the ample vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients that unprocessed food provides. While toxicity risk is low, it’s still near impossible to overdose on folate from foods (who accidentally eats 14 cups of broccoli??), where it’s easy to overdose with a supplement by taking just a couple too many pills. You can’t absorb one vitamin properly without all of the appropriate co-nutrients in balance, and this is where whole food always delivers. For example, the best food source of folate is lentils. Let’s look at the breakdown of the nutrient content of lentils- it’s about way more than folate! 26637747_10101947671173863_641004983_n

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    Data from USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 28, via “Nutrition Data” app

The best food sources of folate per 1 cup, according to daily value (DV):

  • Lentils (90% DV)
  • Pinto beans (74% DV)
  • Garbanzo beans (71% DV)
  • Asparagus (65% DV)
  • Spinach (65% DV)
  • Black beans (64% DV)
  • Navy beans (64% DV)
  • Kidney beans (57% DV)
  • Collard greens (44% DV)
  • Beet root (34% DV)
  • Split peas (32% DV)
  • Papaya- 1 whole (29% DV)

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    My “Fiesta Ranch” salad

If you want more in depth guidance to heal your body naturally, this is what I help people with every day! In my one-on-one personalized holistic health programs, we visit every area of your health in depth to ensure you accomplish all of your health goals permanently. My comprehensive programs give you the step-by-step nutritional changes, personal guidance, support, stress management, recipes, accountability, food sensitivity evaluations, and other tools necessary to make life-changing changes last a lifetime.

Contact me at 920-327-2221 or megan@aayushealth.com for your free consultation!

Warmly,

Megan Normansell, CHC, AADP, CFH

Certified Holistic Practitioner/Holistic Nutritionist/Herbalist/Wild Edibles Guide

Follow me on Facebook and Instagram

for more recipes and healthy living ideas!

http://www.aayushealth.com     –     megan@aayushealth.com    –    920-327-2221

 

Copyright Megan Normansell 2018 All rights reserved. 

Buttery Wild Mushroom Pilaf with Asparagus – Wild gourmet healing dinner for $.35 per serving!

 

SONY DSCTonight’s dinner is a lovely sprouted brown rice risotto with bits of peas and carrots, cooked with some chopped wild wood nettle, which can be used just as spinach or kale would but is much more nutritious. I sauteed the morels (can use any edible wild mushroom) until golden in a bit of butter and Himalayan salt.  Simply sub the butter for something like olive oil to make this vegetarian dish vegan. The pilaf is sprinkled with chives from my garden & flowers from the creeping charlie “weed” in my yard. A garnish of another delicious “weed” in my yard- goldenrod shoots.

Not only is this the type of gourmet meal you’d only find at an upscale restaurant, it’s more nutritious than just about anything you’ll find at a grocery store, and nearly free of cost. Every ingredient has healing properties! What is your experience with foraging- have you picked berries, morels, or asparagus? Let us know! If you’d like to learn more about wild food foraging, check out Wild Food Wisconsin & Aayus Holistic Health Services on facebook.  And helping people live healthier & happier and tackle even the trickiest health issues is my specialty as a naturopathic practitioner- don’t hesitate to contact me at megan@aayushealth.com for your free consult!

– – Goldenrod is good for colds, flu, inflammation, allergies (it’s an antihistamine, not an allergen), & UTIs.
– – Nettles are food for high blood pressure, kidney stones, allergies (also antihistamine), anemia, hay fever, are restorative, antihemorrhagic, nutritive, & promotes lactation & circulation
– – Morels are a great source of vitamin D, are anti-cancer & have been found to reduce the side effects of chemo/radiation
– – Asparagus is a diuretic, supports kidney function, prostate health, helps to prevent cataracts, supports the liver, supports sexual function & helps with muscle recovery
– – Brown rice is great for digestion and helps to normalize bowel function after diarrhea. It helps lower cholesterol, reduce risk of bowel cancer, lower diabetes risk
– – Chives are good for digestion, anemia, relieving gas, help prevent heart disease and stroke, and help your body to digest good fats.
– – Creeping Charlie is anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and has been used traditionally for ulcers, asthma, and clearing up skin. It can be used as a hopping agent to make beer.

Thanks for visiting!

Megan Normansell (Kerkhoff), CHC, AADP, CFH

Certified Holistic Practitioner/Holistic Nutritionist/Herbalist/Wild Edibles Guide

Follow me on Facebook and Instagram for more recipes and healthy living ideas!

Get Even Healthier!
Get the answers you’ve been searching for, and heal your body for good… naturally and holistically.  We have successfully helped thousands of people across the country live a healthier life than they ever could have imagined, and specialize in dozens of different health concerns. Curious? 
Schedule your complimentary consultation with me today! Read the incredible reviews we’ve received over the years here!

http://www.aayushealth.com     –     megan@aayushealth.com    –    920-327-2221

Copyright Megan Normansell 2017 All rights reserved. 

 

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My first morel of the year, used in my dinner! (it’s giant!!)

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The wild wood nettles

Creamy Wild Watercress & Nettle Soup

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watercress nettles motherwort catmint-w

Wild watercress and nettles are sprouting in Wisconsin, and they are quite the culinary treat!

High in calcium, iron, vitamin c, beta-carotene, magnesium, potassium, zinc, copper, vitamin E, vitamin K, lutein, b vitamins, and many more, watercress is rich in potent antioxidants that help to fight cancer. It’s been found to help smokers or those exposed to secondhand smoke excrete the toxins found in cigarettes from their urine in just 3 days.  It’s also good for liver problems.

Stinging nettles are my go-to safe alternative to allergy drugs. They help hayfever and any type of allergies, supporting the immune system and anti-inflammatory response naturally, instead of just covering up symptoms like drugs. This mint can be used for prostate problems, PMS, asthma, bronchitis, sciatica, tendonitis, multiple sclerosis, gout, hives, kidney stones, sciatica, high blood pressure, & eczema. Just about one cup of this veggie will give you half the calcium you need for the day, with good amounts of magnesium, manganese, iron, b vitamins, vitamin k, beta carotene, and potassium.

Both greens are excellent for treating anemia, purifying the blood, and for arthritis.   Note: Be careful not to touch the nettles without gloves- they bite!

Ingredients:

2 cups MSG-free vegetable broth

2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil or organic butter

1 small onion, roughly chopped

1 bunch of watercress

1 bunch of nettles

2 medium potatoes, peeled & chopped

2 tbsp finely chopped fresh chives

¼ cup organic whole plain yogurt, extra to garnish (eliminate to make vegan)

Sprinkle of chives to garnish

Himalayan salt & black pepper to taste

 

Directions:

Bring the broth to a boil, and add the potatoes. Meanwhile in a large saucepan, heat the butter/oil over medium heat. Add the nettles, watercress, and onions. Turn heat down a bit and cook until the onions are translucent. Once your potatoes are tender, add the cooked greens mixture to the pot and boil for a couple minutes. Place in your food processor or blender and puree until smooth. Add the yogurt, then season to taste with the salt & pepper. Ladle into bowls immediately and enjoy!

Warmly,

Megan Normansell (Kerkhoff), CHC, AADP, CFH

Certified Holistic Practitioner/Holistic Nutritionist/Herbalist/Wild Edibles Guide

Follow me on Facebook and Instagram for more recipes and healthy living ideas!

Get Even Healthier!
Get the answers you’ve been searching for, and heal your body for good… naturally and holistically.  We have successfully helped thousands of people across the country live a healthier life than they ever could have imagined, and specialize in dozens of different health concerns. Curious? 
Schedule your complimentary consultation with me today! Read the incredible reviews we’ve received over the years here!

http://www.aayushealth.com     –     megan@aayushealth.com    –    920-327-2221

Strengthen your bones with “Sweets ‘n Beets”

Who has room in their bellies for a whole salad of beet greens, a large beet, an apple, a tangerine, and a whole sweet potato? I sure don’t, so I created a delicious fresh juice instead. And I shall call my creation “Sweets ‘n Beets!”
It has a mild, earthy, and pleasantly sweet flavor to it. I have a ton more energy already and I’m only halfway through drinking it!

So what are the benefits?
This juice cleanses the liver, aids the lymphatic and digestive systems, flushes out uric acid, builds the blood and red blood cells, keeps gums healthy, promotes strong connective tissue, promotes wound healing, lowers risk of cancer, increases energy, lowers cholesterol, protects against viruses, alkalizes your pH, prevents birth defects and reduces nicotine cravings. The beets are great for preventing osteoporosis and keeping your teeth healthy.

It can help treat: liver & gallbladder problems, kidney stones, stomach and intestine maladies, anemia, weakness, blood disorders, liver problems, and depression (increases serotonin).

drrf

“The beet is the most intense of vegetables. The radish, admittedly, is more feverish, but the fire of the radish is a cold fire, the fire of discontent not of passion. Tomatoes are lusty enough, yet there runs through tomatoes an undercurrent of frivolity. Beets are deadly serious.

Slavic peoples get their physical characteristics from potatoes, their smoldering inquietude from radishes, their seriousness from beets.

The beet is the melancholy vegetable, the one most willing to suffer. You can’t squeeze blood out of a turnip…

The beet is the murderer returned to the scene of the crime. The beet is what happens when the cherry finishes with the carrot. The beet is the ancient ancestor of the autumn moon, bearded, buried, all but fossilized; the dark green sails of the grounded moon-boat stitched with veins of primordial plasma; the kite string that once connected the moon to the Earth now a muddy whisker drilling desperately for rubies.

The beet was Rasputin’s favorite vegetable. You could see it in his eyes.”

― Tom Robbins, Jitterbug Perfume

 

Thanks for visiting!

Megan Normansell (Kerkhoff), CHC, AADP, CFH

Certified Holistic Practitioner/Holistic Nutritionist/Herbalist/Wild Edibles Guide

Follow me on Facebook and Instagram for more recipes and healthy living ideas!

Get Even Healthier!
Get the answers you’ve been searching for, and heal your body for good… naturally and holistically.  We have successfully helped thousands of people across the country live a healthier life than they ever could have imagined, and specialize in dozens of different health concerns. Curious? 
Schedule your complimentary consultation with me today! Read the incredible reviews we’ve received over the years here!

http://www.aayushealth.com     –     megan@aayushealth.com    –    920-327-2221