Flowering Miso Ramen Noodle Soup

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This is my quick and easy version of miso soup, utilizing the seasonal flavors of Wisconsin.  You can easily customize it to make it your own! This recipe is vegetarian and gluten free.

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Ingredients:

  • 7 oz of organic tofu or tempeh, cut into small cubes
  • A handful of dried wild-harvested kelp, broken into small pieces. You can also buy flaked dulse or kelp, which is available in natural food stores or on Amazon here. The kelp in my recipe was wild harvested by my husband on the beautiful coast of Cornwall.17904022_10158699659570195_12146867265582433_n17951811_10158699660110195_900942998429416303_n
  • About 48 oz of miso broth. You can make your own with something as simple as miso paste and water, but I used Kettle & Fire brand miso chicken bone broth.
  • Handful of green onions or chives, chopped
  • Handful of your favorite mushrooms, sliced. I’d suggest using whatever is in season in nature, or if you’re not a forager any grocery store mushrooms will do. I used wild oyster mushrooms. 62483073_1312413752243479_8338620546384134144_n (2)
  • 1.5 cups of fresh bean sprouts
  • 5 oz of dried brown rice or black rice ramen noodles. I used BGreen brand. You can also use some cooked whole grain brown or black rice instead.
  • A handful of wildflowers to garnish. I used Damesrocket, as it’s a common tasty invasive in Wisconsin. Violets, creeping Charlie, dandelion flowers, or any edible flowers from your woods or garden would work. Any brassica flowers are edible, so if you grow kale, radishes, etc you can use the flowers from those too! 64436626_385574508969013_500426559715278848_n

Bring your miso broth up to a boil, then add the mushrooms and kelp. After 10 minutes bring the heat down a bit and add the noodles and bean sprouts. Once the noodles have been cooked for the length of time recommended on the package (mine were about 5 minutes) turn the heat off. Now add the tofu/tempeh.

Let sit for 10 minutes, then serve in a bowl. Finish by sprinkling with the chopped green onions or chives and your flowers of choice. Enjoy!!

 

Warmly,

Megan Normansell (Kerkhoff), CHC, AADP, CFH

Certified Holistic Practitioner/Holistic Nutrition/Herbalist/Wild Edibles Guide

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Copyright Megan Normansell 2019 All rights reserved. 

Avocado Quinoa Pilaf

This recipe is simple and easy, yet tasty and packed full of nutritious goodness. You can add any other fresh veggies from your garden or farmers market as well, such as fresh chopped kale or grape tomatoes.

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Ingredients:

2 tbsp olive oil

1 cup chopped onion

1 tsp minced garlic

2 1/2 cups quinoa, soaked and rinsed ( I used a blend of both red and white)

3 cups vegetable or chicken broth

1/2 tsp Himalayan salt

1/2 tsp porcini salt (get mine here.… handcrafted with wild Wisconsin gourmet porcini!)

1 1/2 cups tomatoes, chopped

2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley

2 tsp chopped fresh thyme

2 tbsp lemon juice

4-6 oz feta cheese, crumbled

1 ripe avocado, chopped

1/3 cup cucumber, chopped

1/3 cup bell peppers, chopped small (orange, yellow, red, and/or green)

1 can hearts of palm, sliced into rounds

 

Directions:

Heat the olive oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add onions and garlic, and cook for 5 minutes or until translucent.

Stir in the quinoa, broth, and salt.

Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to a simmer. Cook for about 15 minutes, or until all the liquid is absorbed.

Remove from the heat and stir in tomatoes, parsley, thyme, avocado, cucumber, hearts of palm, peppers, lemon juice and feta. Serve warm and enjoy!

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Warmly,

Megan (Kerkhoff) Normansell, CHC, AADP, CFH

Certified Holistic Practitioner/Holistic Nutrition/Herbalist/Wild Edibles Guide

Follow me on Facebook and Instagram for more recipes and healthy living ideas!

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http://www.aayushealth.com     –     megan@aayushealth.com    –    920-327-2221

 

Copyright Megan Normansell 2019 All rights reserved. 

Roasted Holiday Chestnuts

Chestnuts are now available in stores, and are perfect for the winter season. Their sweet, buttery flavor goes well in many dishes, as well as on their own as a nutritious snack. I’ve found they are so tasty plain that you really don’t need any seasonings.  This easy recipe comes from my husband Matt at Eden Wild Food, who used to forage for wild chestnuts in his home country of England.

Chestnuts provide protein, fiber, calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, zinc, copper, selenium, vitamin B1, B2, B3, B6, B12, vitamin C, folate, pantothenic acid, vitamin a, vitamin e, and heart healthy good fats, so it’s a snack you can feel good about!
Ingredients:
As many raw, fresh chestnuts as you’d like to roast
Directions:
  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  • Very carefully, cut a slit from one end to the other on the flat side of the chestnut, as pictured in the third chestnut from the left.
  • Once you’ve cut all your shells, place them flat side up on a cookie sheet.
  • Bake for about 20-30 minutes, or until you notice the shell along the cracks begins to peel up a bit. Pull them out of the oven and peek at the nut inside- initially they will be soft and floury and are ready to eat at this point. Some people prefer them more caramelized, and the outer surface of the nut will be a more golden brown color. Let them cook until you get the color/texture you’d prefer.
  • Take out of the oven and let cool. To remove the shell, you’ll want to squeeze it from both sides at the same time until the crack widens. Then you’ll be able to peel off the shell and skin to reveal your roasted nut. Enjoy!

Warmly,

Megan Normansell, CHC, AADP, CFH

Certified Holistic Practitioner/Holistic Nutrition/Herbalist/Wild Edibles Guide

Follow me on Facebook and Instagram for more recipes and healthy living ideas!

 

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http://www.aayushealth.com     –     megan@aayushealth.com    –    920-327-2221

 

Copyright Megan Normansell 2018 All rights reserved. 

Maple Butternut Squash & Figs

Squash season is upon us! Butternut has always been my favorite, and I love finding creative ways to enhance its sweetness. Great for bones, eye health, blood pressure, this fall vegetable is chock full of antioxidants, phytonutrients, vitamins, and minerals. Just one cup of it provides you with 6.5 grams of fiber, 19% daily value magnesium, 12% daily value potassium, 41% daily value vitamin C, up to 20% daily value for most of your b vitamins, 163% daily value beta carotene, and more. Try this easy, nutritious dessert (or snack) with just 5 simple ingredients.

What you’ll need:

  • 1 butternut squash (others like acorn squash work fine too!)
  • real maple syrup
  • cinnamon powder
  • hemp seeds
  • dried figs

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Directions:

  • Half or quarter your squash, remove seeds and fibrous pulp, and place it in a baking dish. Pour water in the dish.
  • Bake the squash in the oven at 350 until it is easily pierced with a fork. Depending upon its size, this may take anywhere from 45 minutes to 90 minutes.
  • When it’s fully cooked, peel the skin off and transfer to a bowl. Mash slightly.
  • Drizzle lightly with your maple syrup and sprinkle with desired amounts of cinnamon and hemp seeds.
  • Slice your figs and arrange on top. Serve warm. Enjoy!

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Warmly,

Megan Normansell, CHC, AADP, CFH

Certified Holistic Practitioner/Holistic Nutrition/Herbalist/Wild Edibles Guide

Follow me on Facebook and Instagram for more recipes and healthy living ideas!

Interested in healing your body naturally?
Get the answers you’ve been searching for, and heal your body for good… naturally.  We have successfully helped thousands of people across the country live a healthier life than they ever could have imagined, and specialize in dozens of different health concerns. Curious? 
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http://www.aayushealth.com     –     megan@aayushealth.com    –    920-327-2221

 

Copyright Megan Normansell 2018 All rights reserved. 

Giant Puffball Mushroom Pizza

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If you’re avoiding processed grains/flours or lowering your carbs, or none of the above and just love mindblowing unique food, you’re going to want to try this giant puffball mushroom pizza. Calvatia gigantea is a white, round mushroom commonly found in meadows, fields, and deciduous forests all over the world, and hence the name they can get rather large. The ones pictured here were found on September 10th, 2018 in Wisconsin. While there aren’t a lot of studies on the medicinal benefits, they do contain powerful polysaccharides and have been found to inhibit lung cancer cells. 

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Mushrooms kind of excite me.

If you’re new to wild mushroom hunting be sure you properly identify and don’t confuse them with something like earthballs, which are toxic. These fungi have a soft, bread-like texture so you can use them to make anything you might normally make bread with. French toast is on the menu for tomorrow!

Now get this- the crust of this pizza is made from the thinly sliced puffball mushroom, then it’s topped with FIVE other wild gourmet mushrooms! Obviously most people won’t have access to a crazy amount of different mushroom species, but all you really need to make this pizza is the puffballs.  Throw on your favorite toppings and make it your own, such as onions, peppers, olives, button mushrooms from the store, or pepperoni.

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Some of the other mushroom species included on the pizza, picked just the day before the puffballs

First, I carefully cut them into a round 1 inch thick slice. Then they were pan-fried in a cast iron pan on both sides for about 5 minutes and seasoned with olive oil and Himalayan salt.

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Next, onto the pizza pan. I topped mine with Italian seasonings and pizza sauce, sautéed hedgehog mushrooms, porcini, chicken of the woods, and yellow legged chanterelles, then organic shredded cheese.

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Bake your pizza at 425 for about 10 minutes, or until the cheese is just starting to turn golden brown. These crusts will be soft, not crunchy. Enjoy!!

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Thanks for visiting!

Warmly,

Megan Normansell (Kerkhoff), CHC, AADP, CFH

Certified Holistic Practitioner/Holistic Nutrition/Herbalist/Wild Edibles Guide

Follow me on Facebook and Instagram for more recipes and healthy living ideas!

Get Even Healthier!
Get the answers you’ve been searching for, and heal your body for good… naturally and holistically.  We have successfully helped thousands of people across the country live a healthier life than they ever could have imagined, and specialize in dozens of different health concerns. Curious? 
Schedule your complimentary consultation with me today! Read the incredible reviews we’ve received over the years here!

http://www.aayushealth.com     –     megan@aayushealth.com    –    920-327-2221

 

Copyright Megan Normansell 2018. All rights reserved. 

Banana Blackstrap Blood Building Smoothie

If you’re suffering from iron-deficiency anemia, this is just the recipe for you. It may not look the prettiest, but it is sweet & tasty.

Iron absorption is about more than just the iron. Nutrients like vitamin C, copper, manganese, vitamin a, and folate are essential for healthy ferritin and iron levels, and healthy red blood cell counts. Without the proper nutritional balance, you may find that your iron supplements alone just don’t cut it. This is why when trying to correct a nutritional deficiency, utilizing complimentary whole foods in addition to any supplements is instrumental.

This recipe contains some of the best blood-boosting ingredients in an easy to drink smoothie, supplying plant-based iron plus all of the essential nutrients mentioned above for proper assimilation.

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Ingredients:

  • 1 frozen banana
  • 1 tablespoon black strap molasses
  • ¼ tsp raw cacao powder
  • 1 cup almond milk
  • Handful of spinach or kale
  • 2-4 drops pure vanilla extract

Blend, and enjoy once daily!

Warmly,

Megan Normansell, CHC, AADP, CFH

Certified Holistic Practitioner/Holistic Nutrition/Herbalist/Wild Edibles Guide

Follow me on Facebook and Instagram for more recipes and healthy living ideas!

Interested in healing your body naturally?
Get the answers you’ve been searching for, and heal your body for good… naturally. We have successfully helped thousands of people across the country live a healthier life than they ever could have imagined, and specialize in dozens of different health concerns. Curious? Schedule your complimentary consultation with me today! Read the incredible reviews we’ve received over the years here.

http://www.aayushealth.com – megan@aayushealth.com – 920-327-2221

 

Copyright Megan Normansell 2018 All rights reserved. 

Lentil Tacos with Creamy Avocado Lime Dressing

Trying to lose weight, reduce portions, reduce inflammation, regulate digestion, improve diabetes, treat anemia, increase energy, prevent cancer,  improve atherosclerosis, support heart health, help your nervous system, live longer, or grow a healthy baby? Lentils, a part of the human diet since Paleolithic times, may be your new best friend. This pulse even has more disease-fighting phenols than apples, cherries, plums, broccoli, cabbage, grapes, & onions.

 

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Filling Ingredients:

  • 1 medium onion, finely diced
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • I large tomato, cubed
  • 2 cups of cooked lentils
  • 1 tsp chili powder
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp Himalayan salt
  • 2 cups of shredded red cabbage
  • Juice of 1/2 lime
  • 4 medium carrots, shredded
  • Cilantro to garnish
  • ½ avocado, sliced or cubed
  • 8 organic corn tortillas

Sauce Ingredients:

  • ½ cup organic plain Greek yogurt
  • ¼ tsp Himalayan salt
  • Juice of 1/2 lime
  • ½ pureed avocado

Directions:

  1. Heat the olive oil in a large pan and saute the onions for 3-5 minutes or until translucent.
  2. Add the chili powder, paprika, cumin, garlic, turmeric, salt, cooked lentils, and tomatoes to the onions, and stir well for another 5 minutes.
  3. Place your carrot shreds and cabbage shreds in their own bowls. Cut your lime in half and squeeze one of the halves over the carrots and cabbage. Sprinkle with Himalayan salt.
  4. Prepare your sauce by mixing the yogurt, avocado puree, ¼ tsp salt, and the juice from the remaining lime half together in a bowl.
  5. Serve on warmed tortillas as pictured and enjoy!

 

Warmly,

Megan Normansell, CHC, AADP, CFH

Certified Holistic Practitioner/Holistic Nutrition/Herbalist/Wild Edibles Guide

Follow me on Facebook and Instagram for more recipes and healthy living ideas!

Interested in healing your body naturally?
Get the answers you’ve been searching for, and heal your body for good… naturally. We have successfully helped thousands of people across the country live a healthier life than they ever could have imagined, and specialize in dozens of different health concerns. Curious? Schedule your complimentary consultation with me today! Read the incredible reviews we’ve received over the years here.

http://www.aayushealth.com – megan@aayushealth.com – 920-327-2221

 

Copyright Megan Normansell 2018 All rights reserved. 

The Paleo Diet- It Isn’t What You Think It Is

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The Paleolithic period, also known as a part of the Stone Age, lasted 2.6 million years ago to about 12,000 years ago and has inspired many an idea of what your plate should look like today. The modern dietary theory called the “Paleo Diet” or “Caveman Diet” professes that ancient hunters/gatherers shared a certain diet during that period, and that diet is still essential for reclaiming our health in contemporary times. While there is variability in the way it is interpreted, the diet typically includes specific vegetables, fruits, nuts, roots, and meat and excludes certain other vegetables, dairy, grains, legumes, certain oils, artificial ingredients, salt, & alcohol.

Now, my profession consists of telling people to eat vegetables. I’m not here to put down any diet that aims to do the same. I’ve been professionally trained in the modern Paleo diet, along with dozens of other dietary theories that I use with my clients. Any diet that says “just eat real food” is always going to point you in the direction of better health. But alas, I am an eternal “vegetable truther.” Where there is misinformation in the nutrition industry, I will seek to set the record straight. Do you follow the modern day “Paleo Diet?” Cool. Keep eating it. Just know it’s not actually Paleo. Many foods that are today being touted as being “paleo” did not even exist during the Paleolithic era. Many foods on the modern paleo diet “no” list were actually staples in a true, historically accurate Paleo diet. Don’t believe me? Keep reading. Are you interested in learning more about the real Paleo diet? Cool. Also keep reading.

Now the wonderful thing about any ancient, traditional diet is that there were no orthorexic rules that our society seems so obsessed with today- it was eat what nature provided, when nature provided it. A true paleo diet can best be described as “opportunistic omnivores.” I like that. Unfortunately today, that same term would translate to going to whatever McDonalds is closest to your house.

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Using today’s terminology we could describe a true paleo diet as organic (all food was organic until the 1940’s), non-GMO (genetically modified crops were not manufactured and introduced into our food supply until the 1980’s), whole, local, seasonal, and wild. There were no isolated synthetic vitamins and minerals to fortify with, no preservatives, artificial colors and flavors, MSG and synthetic flavor enhancers, pesticides, herbicides, etc.

Paleo people were more well-nourished and had less famine than the Neolithic and more agrarian cultures that followed them. They had a wider variety of natural foods and they were foragers, with no dependence on a small number of crops and cultivated foods like we do in modern times. I can personally harvest over 30 species of wild plants in the park in my suburban village- imagine how much more food a person would have had within arm’s reach back in that period of time.

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Although not quite old enough to be Paleolithic, Otzi the ice man gives us unique insight into what a diet looked like before most of our food was cultivated. As he lived near regions that we’ll be discussing and used most of the same methods to obtain his food, his diet likely would not vary much from a typical version of a true Paleolithic diet.

Otzi, the incredibly well-preserved iceman discovered in 1991, lived in the region that is now northern Italy, some 5,300 years ago. And his last meal consisted of… wild goat (Ibex) and Einkorn wheat.

Now wheat is an interesting one, as it’s been demonized by many different dietary theories today.

As a holistic nutrition practitioner with Celiac disease, I understand better than most how damaging gluten-containing grains can be. However, I also understand that everybody’s bodies are dramatically different, one man’s poison may be another man’s food and vice versa. Unless I work with a client and find them to have a genuine wheat or gluten allergy or intolerance, I will not immediately rush to tell them to eliminate it. When we get into cutting out whole foods without any solid reason other than “I read about it in this book” or “this guy says it’s bad for everyone” or “this person punched this into a machine and the printout says I can’t eat it” then meal planning and eating becomes this stressful, confusing, frustrating, messy, overly-restricted and eventually despised regimen. Common sense gets thrown out the window too many times. Keep it simple.

But I digress.

In some people the culprit may not even be the wheat itself, but what’s been done to it. The modern wheat you get in stores today is not even remotely close to distant cousins like Einkorn. For my wheat-eating clients I recommend ancient, organic varieties of it such as Einkorn or spelt, in the unrefined, unmilled form.

The term Einkorn wheat refers to two different types- the wild form, triticum boeoticum, or the domesticated form, triticum monococcum. As records of domestication of wheat go back to just 8,650 to 7,950 BC, this clearly was not a part of the true Paleolithic diet. However, archaological evidence in Syria found that humans may have started harvesting this wild wheat around 30,000 years ago. That makes this wheat a very paleo treat. Triticum boeoticum has been traced back to pre-neolithic sites in Turkey and areas throughout northern Europe. It is a low-yielding grain, thus was eaten in small quantities. Wheat was eaten in the same way we’d eat it in its whole food form today- boiled in water whole or eaten as porridge, similar to how we make oatmeal today.

Compared to modern wheat, Einkorn has more protein, healthy fats, magnesium, b6, beta carotene, and potassium.

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wheat! it’s coming for you!

Anthropologists have found that proportions of foods consumed varied quite a bit. You tend to find that chillier areas are more meat-heavy out of necessity. The extra calories, fat, and warmth were needed to thrive in cold climates. When you were hungry, you hunted.

Certain areas have also been found to be far more plant-based, with very small amounts of meat. Other areas were higher in carbs, with tubers being a main staple. So a paleo diet did not necessarily mean lots of meat or low carb, either. It is estimated the average true Paleolithic diet consisted of 3.6-4.2 pounds of fruits and vegetables daily.

So lets compare. How does the modern “Paleo diet” stack up against the true historically accurate Paleo diet?

  • Dairy? The modern Paleo Diet says no. Is it truly Paleo? Yes! There is evidence that late paleo cultures most likely domesticated reindeer for their meat and dairy as early as 14,000 BC.
  • Against the grain? Now we know that the true paleo diet did indeed include grains. One variety of quinoa (chenopodium quinoa var. melanospermum) was believed to be in the ancient paleo diet. But since they were not cultivated they were not available in large quantities. Your plate reflected what you picked. Small servings.
  • Soy free? My research says yes, the paleo diet was devoid of soy.
  • Gluten free? Nope!
  • Sugar free? No! The true paleo diet embraced all fruits that were available to them.
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wild grapes would have been eaten during paleolithic times

  • Refined sugar free? Yes! Just say no to refined white sugar.
  • Vegan? No! At least not by choice. Opportunistic omnivores. However if the opportunity was not there or if you were a terrible hunter, you may be a temporary (and hangry) vegan.
  • Alcohol free? Probably. One archaeologist believes fermented wild grape wine traces back to 8,500 BC, which is not quite long enough ago to be considered Paleo. Unless they kept their magic spirits secret…
  • BACON! There is no evidence of pigs being eaten during Paleolithic times. Sorry. Bacon, pork, ham, etc are simply not true paleo foods.
  • Legumes? Legumes have been found in Paleolithic archaeobotanical findings in Kebara Cave, Israel and there are varieties that would have been consumed during the Paleo era including Fabaceaes like peas, vetch, and clover. Archaeological finds have found peas to be a part of the Paleolithic diet in Switzerland. Lentils have been traced back to the Greek diet as far as 11,000 BC, which puts it in that Paleo grey area. But I don’t think it’s unreasonable to think that they could have been consumed around 12,000 BC, so we’ll label lentils as a “Paleo maybe-o.”
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vicia americana, American vetch

Foods you think are Paleo that really aren’t:

  • Bell peppers: these are a modern cultivar
  • Kale: came about around 300 BC
  • Broccoli: made from a kale predecessor in the 1500s
  • Cabbage (savoy): dates back to the 1500s
  • Kohlrabi: also from the 1500s
  • Brussels sprouts: first used in the 400’s, the modern cultivar you eat today came about in the 1200s
  • Cauliflower: bred in the 1300-1400s
  • Bananas: the bananas you eat today have been around for less than 200 years. If you lived in Papua New Guinea, you would have eaten banana cultivars beginning around 5000-8000 BC. But still not exactly paleo.
  • Apples: any that are not crabapples. This includes your honeycrisp, golden and red delicious, gala, braeburn, and so on.
  • Chicken: The chicken you’re eating today is a modernized hybrid of junglefowl and would not have been a component of a truly Paleo diet. The first records of the chicken you know and love today being eaten are from 600 BC.
  • Zucchini: this is a pretty new food- zucchini as you know it was developed in the second half of the 19th century in Italy. Summer squashes are native to Mexico and can be traced back to 7,000 to 5,500 BC, so would not have been part of the paleo diet in Europe.
  • Olive oil: Olives were not known to be picked until the Neolithic peoples, and archaeological evidence shows that they were first made into olive oil between 6000 BC and 4500 BC in Israel. Sorry, your olive oil isn’t Paleo.

So while of course there are large variances in the true Paleolithic diet based upon what was available at the time, here’s the rundown of what was really eaten during that time period:

  • Fish
  • Legumes
  • Seeds
  • Nuts
  • Grains
  • Children were weaned much later than they typically are today, so children had the advantage of breastmilk for many years
  • Animals such as wooly mammoths, deer, seals, elands, shellfish, carrion, & birds
  • Eggs
  • Tubers & roots
  • Fruits
  • Insects
  • Raw dairy
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ancient wild foods harvested near my home

On top of that there are many of today’s wild foods that we know were around during Neolithic times. I have no reason to believe these were not available 12,000 years ago or longer:

  • Stinging nettles
  • Beech nut
  • Garlic mustard
  • Lambs quarters
  • Acorns
  • Hazelnuts
  • Burdock root
  • Wild grapes
  • Elder flowers and berry
  • Blackberries
  • Raspberries
  • Wild turnips
  • Crab apples
  • Bolete mushrooms: mushrooms are a difficult food to detect in ancient remains, but we do have evidence of bolete mushrooms being consumed in Spain 18,000-12,000 years ago
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boletes like these that my husband harvested would have been eaten

Curious, intriguing, surprising, and inspiring isn’t it? While I’m not telling you to go make this your end-all diet, I do think our modern “diet culture” can take some lessons from the Paleolithic peoples. Eat real food, mostly plants, no whole natural food is inherently bad, and relax. Oh, and eat your nettles.

Warmly,

Megan Normansell, CHC, AADP, CFH

Certified Holistic Practitioner/Holistic Nutrition/Herbalist/Wild Edibles Guide

Follow me on Facebook and Instagram for more recipes and healthy living ideas!

Interested in healing your body naturally?
Get the answers you’ve been searching for, and heal your body for good… naturally. We have successfully helped thousands of people across the country live a healthier life than they ever could have imagined, and specialize in dozens of different health concerns. Curious? Schedule your complimentary consultation with me today! Read the incredible reviews we’ve received over the years here.

http://www.aayushealth.com – megan@aayushealth.com – 920-327-2221

 

Copyright Megan Normansell 2018 All rights reserved. 

8 Incredible Reasons to Eat Star Anise

Star Anise is an aromatic, liquorice- flavored spice that is widely used in Indian, Malay, Chinese, and Indonesian cuisine. As with all herbs, it is not only a culinary delight but has some powerful medicinal properties. Find it in the spice aisle of your local grocery store, preferably organic.

1. Star Anise has antibacterial, anti-viral properties and helps to fight infection. Almost all of the world’s star anise crop is used for extraction of shikimic acid, the chemical used in the synthesis of Tamiflu. Can you imagine how much safer it must be to use the unadulterated, whole food form of the medicine? This herb is indicated specifically for the flu, sinus infections and bronchial infections. Take it at the first sign of illness and each day you are ill, preferably in the tea form. See my recipe below.

2. It has compounds such as creosol and alpha-pimene that clear mucus from air passages, soothe a sore throat, and make dry, irritating coughs more productive. The Greeks used to make teas with it to help asthma and other respiratory ailments.

3. Promotes milk production in nursing mothers.

4. It is carminitive (relieves gas) and is good for indigestion.

5. Is helpful for PMS and menopausal symptoms, and gently encourages childbirth.

6. Supplies calcium, iron, magnesium, manganese, potassium, zinc, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin A, and five B vitamins.

7. The seeds from this powerfully scented herb have been used as a tea for thousands of years to help treat bad breath.

8. Star Anise contains a compound called anethol, which has been reported to increase sex drive in women.

Here we used star anise to make a flavorful immune boosting tea with a handful of chaga mushroom chunks, 1 cinnamon bark stick, and 1/4 cup of elderberries in a stock pot.

Explore the many culinary applications to get the benefits of this wonderful medicine provided by nature!

Warmly,

Megan Normansell, CHC, AADP, CFH

Certified Holistic Practitioner/Holistic Nutrition/Herbalist/Wild Edibles Guide

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Creamy Wild Mushroom & Brie Soup

It’s no secret the canned cream of mushroom soup is horrendous for your health. Is there even any real food in there?? Here we have a much more flavorful and healthy alternative- great eaten on its own with a salad, or used as a replacement for cream of mushroom soup in your favorite recipes.

mushroombrie soup

Nom!

To add a wild twist to mine, I chose to use wild chanterelle mushrooms that I had frozen from last summer’s harvest. But you can use any mushroom you can get your hands on and it’ll still be wonderful! In place of the white wine I used my maple sap wine that we brewed with sap from the maples in our yard last winter. (wow that stuff is strong!)

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Ingredients:

  • 16-24 oz mushrooms
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 2 tablespoons of gluten-free flour
  • 1/2 cup white wine
  • 4 cups of vegetable broth
  • 6-10 ounces brie, rind cut off and cut into smaller squares
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • sea salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

  1. Finely chop 3/4 of the mushrooms, and then slice the rest into thin pieces.
  2. Melt the butter in a pan over medium heat and add the mushrooms. Cook for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently.
  3. Add the onions, thyme, and garlic to the mushrooms and cook on medium heat for about 5 minutes, or until the onions are translucent.
  4. Add the flour and wine then cook for another 5 minutes.
  5. Add the milk and brie, and stir as until the brie fully melts.
  6. Separate the bigger slices of mushrooms, then puree the rest of it in a blender or food processor. Then add in the mushroom pieces for some texture, and enjoy!

Warmly,

Megan Normansell (Kerkhoff), CHC, AADP, CFH

Certified Holistic Practitioner/Holistic Nutrition/Herbalist/Wild Edibles Guide

Follow me on Facebook and Instagram for more recipes and healthy living ideas!

Get Even Healthier!
Get the answers you’ve been searching for, and heal your body for good… naturally and holistically.  We have successfully helped thousands of people across the country live a healthier life than they ever could have imagined, and specialize in dozens of different health concerns. Curious? 
Schedule your complimentary consultation with me today! Read the incredible reviews we’ve received over the years here!

http://www.aayushealth.com     –     megan@aayushealth.com    –    920-327-2221

 

Copyright Megan Normansell 2018 All rights reserved.